• Bridging the gap between gamers and non-gamers - <span style="font-size:  34px; font-weight:600">How might we design a service that helps bridge the gap between gamers and non-gamers?</span>

<span style="font-weight: 600; color:grey">Master of Design at The Oslo School of Architecture & Design</span>
<span style="font-weight: 600; color:grey">Service Design 1: Methods & Tools</span>
<span style="color:grey">*Professor: Kaja Misvær Kistorp | Manuela Aguirre*
*Team: Hanna Nordland,  Sooyeong Song, Mirte van der Nat & Ameesha Timbadia*</span>

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<span style="font-size:24px"><span style="font-weight:600">1. Research + Interviews + Analysis</span></span>

We interviewed gaming enthusiasts and harcore gamers. 
<span style="font-weight: 600">11 men +  2 women | Aged 22 to 33 | 6 nationalities</span>
They played <span style="font-weight: 600">World of Warcraft, CS GO, Dota 2, League of Legends, Minecraft, Age of Empires, PUBG, Fortnite</span>

Most of them viewed gaming as a leisure activity, few wanted to pursue a career in the gaming industry and a couple had formerly been involved with professional gaming (couldn’t get in touch with current professional athletes, as they were busy training)

The gamers that we interviewed were quite aware about their own relationship with gaming. We had conversations about their journey in gaming, the challenges and benefits it brings, financial and social aspects, toxic culture in the gaming community.

To process the information we collected, we put the transcripts and notes from the interviews up on the wall. 
We tried to see connections  and extracted interesting quotes and observations.

    How might we design a service that helps bridge the gap between gamers and non-gamers?

    Master of Design at The Oslo School of Architecture & Design
    Service Design 1: Methods & Tools
    Professor: Kaja Misvær Kistorp | Manuela Aguirre
    Team: Hanna Nordland, Sooyeong Song, Mirte van der Nat & Ameesha Timbadia


    1. Research + Interviews + Analysis

    We interviewed gaming enthusiasts and harcore gamers.
    11 men + 2 women | Aged 22 to 33 | 6 nationalities
    They played World of Warcraft, CS GO, Dota 2, League of Legends, Minecraft, Age of Empires, PUBG, Fortnite

    Most of them viewed gaming as a leisure activity, few wanted to pursue a career in the gaming industry and a couple had formerly been involved with professional gaming (couldn’t get in touch with current professional athletes, as they were busy training)

    The gamers that we interviewed were quite aware about their own relationship with gaming. We had conversations about their journey in gaming, the challenges and benefits it brings, financial and social aspects, toxic culture in the gaming community.

    To process the information we collected, we put the transcripts and notes from the interviews up on the wall.
    We tried to see connections and extracted interesting quotes and observations.

  • Bridging the gap between gamers and non-gamers
  • Bridging the gap between gamers and non-gamers - <br>


<span style="font-size:  26px">To summarise our findings, we highlighted <span style="font-weight: 600">9  key insights</span>


    To summarise our findings, we highlighted 9 key insights

  • Bridging the gap between gamers and non-gamers - ----

<span style="font-size:24px"><span style="font-weight:600">2. Ideation & Scoping</span>

    2. Ideation & Scoping

  • Bridging the gap between gamers and non-gamers - We presented our findings to a group of about 20 key stakeholders. Following that we facilitated a workshop with them to get their opinions. We then did some brainstorming and ideation sessions amongst ourselves to come up with ideas that we thought had potential. In order to decide on a direction, we agreed on some evaluation criteria that we found important. One of them was whether or not it seemed realistic to implement the service. Another was the expected extent of the impact of the service.

With these criteria in mind, we saw the most potential in the direction of bridging gamers with non-gamers. In order to work preventively, rather than correctively we chose our target group to be children + parents.

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<span style="font-size:24px"><span style="font-weight:600">3. Proposal: The Gaming game</span>

<span style="font-size:20px">The Gaming Game is a tangible game that lets parents & children understand each other’s views on gaming, and explore positive and negative impacts of gaming through meaningful conversations and fun activities, with the ultimate goal of creating a better and healthier gaming environment.
<br>
<span style="font-weight: 600; font-size:20px">One-time game | 5 stages | 5-14 days | <strike>Buy</strike> Borrow</span>

    We presented our findings to a group of about 20 key stakeholders. Following that we facilitated a workshop with them to get their opinions. We then did some brainstorming and ideation sessions amongst ourselves to come up with ideas that we thought had potential. In order to decide on a direction, we agreed on some evaluation criteria that we found important. One of them was whether or not it seemed realistic to implement the service. Another was the expected extent of the impact of the service.

    With these criteria in mind, we saw the most potential in the direction of bridging gamers with non-gamers. In order to work preventively, rather than correctively we chose our target group to be children + parents.


    3. Proposal: The Gaming game

    The Gaming Game is a tangible game that lets parents & children understand each other’s views on gaming, and explore positive and negative impacts of gaming through meaningful conversations and fun activities, with the ultimate goal of creating a better and healthier gaming environment.


    One-time game | 5 stages | 5-14 days | Buy Borrow

  • Stage 1: Perception

    A stack of picture cards, not directly linked to gaming. Players select three pictures that they associated the most with online gaming, and explain their choices to the other player. This starts a conversation around gaming and helps both parents and kids know how the other perceives gaming.

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  • Bridging the gap between gamers and non-gamers - <span style="font-weight: 600; font-size:20px">Stage 2: Translation</span>

<span style="font-size:18px">The gaming world is filled with gaming jargon that non-gamers wouldn’t understand. Stage 2 is a collection of 'Gaming Lingo' cards that contain commonly used terms, followed by discussion questions that let the players reflect on different topics ranging from online etiquette to toxic culture to their own gaming habits. It is a way to introduce the non-gamer into the  gaming world.

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    Stage 2: Translation

    The gaming world is filled with gaming jargon that non-gamers wouldn’t understand. Stage 2 is a collection of 'Gaming Lingo' cards that contain commonly used terms, followed by discussion questions that let the players reflect on different topics ranging from online etiquette to toxic culture to their own gaming habits. It is a way to introduce the non-gamer into the gaming world.

    ................................................................

  • Bridging the gap between gamers and non-gamers - <span style="font-weight: 600; font-size:20px">Stage 3: Discovery</span>

<span style="font-size:18px">Each card contains a statement that might be true or false. These statements cover topics ranging from health issues to negative stereotypes to benefits of gaming. The players divide the stack in to two and guess if the statement is true or false. Correct answer is on the other side of the card.

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    Stage 3: Discovery

    Each card contains a statement that might be true or false. These statements cover topics ranging from health issues to negative stereotypes to benefits of gaming. The players divide the stack in to two and guess if the statement is true or false. Correct answer is on the other side of the card.

    ................................................................

  • Bridging the gap between gamers and non-gamers - <span style="font-weight: 600; font-size:20px">Stage 4: Exploration</span>

<span style="font-size:18px">This stage gives both players to actually try out each other's game of choice.

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    Stage 4: Exploration

    This stage gives both players to actually try out each other's game of choice.

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  • Bridging the gap between gamers and non-gamers - <span style="font-weight: 600; font-size:20px">Stage 5: Reflection</span>

<span style="font-size:18px">At the end both players reflect on what their own perception, new discoveries and try to come to a mutual agreement

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<span style="font-size:24px"><span style="font-weight:600">4. Service Blueprint</span>

    Stage 5: Reflection

    At the end both players reflect on what their own perception, new discoveries and try to come to a mutual agreement


    4. Service Blueprint

  • Bridging the gap between gamers and non-gamers
  • Bridging the gap between gamers and non-gamers - <span style="font-size:24px"><span style="font-weight:600">5. Testing + Iteration</span>

We tested our concept with 4 families. We used low fidelity prototypes to see what works and what doesn't and based on their feedback and our observation we made some design decisions

<span style="font-weight: 600">Divided in 5 stages</span>
We decided to divide the game into 5 parts to make it flexible to play as and when the parents had the time and keeping in mind children’s attention span. Low threshold

<span style="font-weight: 600">Parent = child</span>
By doing the same tasks they realised that they are more similar than they think. Especially in terms of screentime

<span style="font-weight: 600">Screentime</span>
We discovered that parents and children, both spend a considerable amount of time in front of screens, be it gaming or social media. Actually making a note of it on paper made them both realise how much it was and if they should make changes.

<span style="font-weight: 600">Raising discussions</span>
We designed questions to initiate conversations and tried to include it throughout the experience. We aimed to address points parents worry about like violence, addiction and toxicity in the gaming environment. It also makes the child feel the parents have an open mind and are actually willing to understand gaming.

<span style="font-weight: 600">Child = expert</span>
Making the child the expert and letting them teach the parents by sharing their own stories not only gives a feeling of accomplishment but also makes them open up to parents

<span style="font-weight: 600">Rewarding system</span>
The possibility of winning or losing quickly increases engagement. Also the concept of store helps initiate the conversation about spending in-game money.

<span style="font-weight: 600">The good game agreement</span>
A need for establishing a set of common rules was felt. Also there is something about writing something down, it gives a feeling of ownership to the children. It was also a way to provide closure for the game

    5. Testing + Iteration

    We tested our concept with 4 families. We used low fidelity prototypes to see what works and what doesn't and based on their feedback and our observation we made some design decisions

    Divided in 5 stages
    We decided to divide the game into 5 parts to make it flexible to play as and when the parents had the time and keeping in mind children’s attention span. Low threshold

    Parent = child
    By doing the same tasks they realised that they are more similar than they think. Especially in terms of screentime

    Screentime
    We discovered that parents and children, both spend a considerable amount of time in front of screens, be it gaming or social media. Actually making a note of it on paper made them both realise how much it was and if they should make changes.

    Raising discussions
    We designed questions to initiate conversations and tried to include it throughout the experience. We aimed to address points parents worry about like violence, addiction and toxicity in the gaming environment. It also makes the child feel the parents have an open mind and are actually willing to understand gaming.

    Child = expert
    Making the child the expert and letting them teach the parents by sharing their own stories not only gives a feeling of accomplishment but also makes them open up to parents

    Rewarding system
    The possibility of winning or losing quickly increases engagement. Also the concept of store helps initiate the conversation about spending in-game money.

    The good game agreement
    A need for establishing a set of common rules was felt. Also there is something about writing something down, it gives a feeling of ownership to the children. It was also a way to provide closure for the game

Bridging the gap between gamers and non-gamers

Service Design